Your email is not valid
Recipient's email is not valid
Submit Close

Your email has been sent.

Click here to send another

thescroll_header

A Freilekhn Gebortstog, Moishe Shagal

A birthday message

Print Email
From Birthday (1915), by Marc Chagall.(MOMA)

Today is Moishe Shagall’s birthday. Born July 6, 1887, in the Belorussian town of Vitebsk, he became better known as Marc Chagall. If, somehow, even that name doesn’t ring a bell, we suggest you check out Jonathan Wilson’s biography for Nextbook Press, or at least read Wilson’s introductory essay about the legendary artist, in which Wilson explained, “Chagall’s oeuvre, when seen in its entirety, seems altogether more historical, more political, harder and edgier than conventional wisdom would have us believe.”

Finally, if you reside on the Eastern Seaboard and wish to check out some of Chagall’s work, this weekend is your last chance to visit Paris Through the Window: Chagall and His Circle at the Philadelphia Museum of Art; the exhibit closes July 10. There’s still plenty of time, however, to view the newly restored America Windows installation piece at the Art Institute in Chicago.

One painting you won’t be able to see on Chagall’s birthday is, ironically, “Birthday.” It’s in the collection of the Museum of Modern Art in New York, and not currently on display. You can, however, buy a reproduction for yourself on eBay.

Introduction to Marc Chagall [Nextbook.org]
Marc Chagall [Nextbook Press]
Related: Hasidic Cubism [Tablet Magazine]
Rhapsody in Blue [Tablet Magazine]

Print Email
2000

Your comment may be no longer than 2,000 characters, approximately 400 words. HTML tags are not permitted, nor are more than two URLs per comment. We reserve the right to delete inappropriate comments.

Thank You!

Thank you for subscribing to the Tablet Magazine Daily Digest.
Please tell us about you.

A Freilekhn Gebortstog, Moishe Shagal

A birthday message

More on Tablet:

Klinghoffer at the Met

By Paul Berman — John Adams’s masterpiece is about an American Jew murdered by Palestinian terrorists, but the real opera is off stage