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Daybreak: Syrian Unrest

Plus Rafah slammed shut, and more in the news

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The ceasefire line yesterday.(Uriel Sinai/Getty Images)

• Yesterday, on Naksa Day, many protesters, mostly Palestinian, tried to enter the Israeli-controlled Golan Heights, and Israeli troops fired back. Syrian news reported 22 deaths, a figure the IDF said was exaggerated. [NYT]

• Meanwhile, Syrian forces killed 38 Syrians as part of the continued put-down of the anti-regime uprising. [NYT]

• Soon after Egypt closed its side of the Rafah Crossing into Gaza (shortly after opening it), Hamas closed its side; apparently the Egyptian move took Hamas by surprise. [Haaretz]

• Defense Minister Barak slammed former Mossad chief Meir Dagan for criticizing military action against Iran, saying he was harming Israel’s “ability to deter.” [Haaretz]

• The United States reportedly offered to give Turkey a major role in brokering Mideast talks if it agreed to stop the flotilla set to sail for Gaza this month. [Haaretz]

• Iranian President Ahmadinejad reiterated his regional analysis, namely that Israel is the obstacle to peace. [Ynet]

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The Naksa Day NYT hyperlink brings readers to an obituary for Dr. Irwin Mandel, a pioneering dentist. While his contributions to oral hygiene are no doubt significant, I don’t think he was closely involved in any aspect of the protests.

I think ‘Syrian Army Irregulars’ would be a better term than ‘protestors’. Protestors aren’t dispatched by a government for the express purpose of creating a political red herring.

Hershel (Heshy) Ginsburg says:

Jeffrey Goldberg (a.k.a. Goldblog) notes some problems with the ostensibly omniscient NY Times report (here: http://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2011/06/how-many-people-were-killed-on-the-syrian-border/239954/).

Goldberg refers to a “strange passage” in the Times report and wonders why the Times accepts Syria’s account of the events uncritically when it is clear that they are trying to divert attention away from their slaughter of their own citizens within their own borders.

There have been several instances within the past month or so where Goldberg has noted biased idiosyncrasies in the way the allegedly august NY Times (“Valhalla” we are told by the new editor in chief, Jill Abramson (comment since scrubbed from the article on her appointment)) reports on all matters Israeli. This is interesting from someone who in the past has place the Times on the highest of journalistic pedestals. Methinks that Goldberg’s worshipful attitude toward the Times may yet go the path of his attitude toward Human Rights Watch, J Street and other icons of the progressobabbelian pantheon.

Hershel Ginsburg

Jerusalem / Efrata

2000

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Daybreak: Syrian Unrest

Plus Rafah slammed shut, and more in the news

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