Your email is not valid
Recipient's email is not valid
Submit Close

Your email has been sent.

Click here to send another

thescroll_header

Taylor Remembered for Early AIDS Work

Prompted by Rock Hudson’s death, she fought the fight before it was cool

Print Email
Taylor in 2007.(Ethan Miller/Getty Images)

In case you missed it, contributing editor Rachel Shukert published a gorgeous appreciation of Elizabeth Taylor yesterday in Tablet Magazine. One thing Shukert lists among Taylor’s accomplishments is her extremely early advocacy of AIDS awareness, in part prompted by the death of her friend, Rock Hudson, of AIDS in 1985.

“Dame Elizabeth was without doubt one of the most inspirational figures in the fight against AIDS,” amFAR, the AIDS research organization, said in a statement yesterday. “She was among the first to speak out on behalf of people living with HIV when others reacted with fear and often outright hostility. For 25 years, Dame Elizabeth has been a passionate advocate of AIDS research, treatment and care. She has testified eloquently on Capitol Hill, while raising millions of dollars for amfAR.”

Below, a Frontline segment details how Taylor personally got President Ronald Reagan to address the disease then ravaging America’s urban gay community for the only time during his presidency.

Watch the full episode. See more FRONTLINE.

Passion [Tablet Magazine]
Elizabeth Taylor’s Legacy: AIDS’s First Famous Advocate [ABC News]
Elizabeth Taylor’s Legacy on AIDS [Frontline]

Print Email

COMMENTING CHARGES
Daily rate: $2
Monthly rate: $18
Yearly rate: $180

WAIT, WHY DO I HAVE TO PAY TO COMMENT?
Tablet is committed to bringing you the best, smartest, most enlightening and entertaining reporting and writing on Jewish life, all free of charge. We take pride in our community of readers, and are thrilled that you choose to engage with us in a way that is both thoughtful and thought-provoking. But the Internet, for all of its wonders, poses challenges to civilized and constructive discussion, allowing vocal—and, often, anonymous—minorities to drag it down with invective (and worse). Starting today, then, we are asking people who'd like to post comments on the site to pay a nominal fee—less a paywall than a gesture of your own commitment to the cause of great conversation. All proceeds go to helping us bring you the ambitious journalism that brought you here in the first place.

I NEED TO BE HEARD! BUT I DONT WANT TO PAY.
Readers can still interact with us free of charge via Facebook, Twitter, and our other social media channels, or write to us at letters@tabletmag.com. Each week, we’ll select the best letters and publish them in a new letters to the editor feature on the Scroll.

We hope this new largely symbolic measure will help us create a more pleasant and cultivated environment for all of our readers, and, as always, we thank you deeply for your support.

All right, that is a good start but i’m going to explore that a touch more. Will let you know what else i’ve found.

I was aware about this previously, nevertheless there have been some beneficial pieces that finalized the image for me, thank you so much!

2000

Your comment may be no longer than 2,000 characters, approximately 400 words. HTML tags are not permitted, nor are more than two URLs per comment. We reserve the right to delete inappropriate comments.

Thank You!

Thank you for subscribing to the Tablet Magazine Daily Digest.
Please tell us about you.

Taylor Remembered for Early AIDS Work

Prompted by Rock Hudson’s death, she fought the fight before it was cool

More on Tablet:

11 Non-Jewish Celebrities—and 2 Jewish Ones—Show Off Their Hebrew Tattoos

By Marjorie Ingall — You don’t have to be Jewish to sport Hebrew ink. But some of these stars should have thought twice before going under the needle.