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Building Hillels To Entice

Colleges aspire to being Jew Us

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The Lehigh University Hillel.(Lehigh Hillel.)

Sue Fishkoff files a great story in JTA on the “nearly 25 percent of Jewish college students in North America [who] attend schools with small Jewish student bodies and limited Jewish resources”—and on the colleges (in particular small liberal-arts colleges) that are actively trying to recruit them. Whether it is constructing new Hillel centers, recruiting at Schechters, or providing kosher dining options, many small, rural schools are taking advantage of the ever-increasing selectivity of the more prominent and generally more urban institutions that tend the 100,000 annual college-bound Jewish high school graduates tend to favor.

Writes Fishkoff:

Admissions officers and deans at these schools rarely say they are actively recruiting Jewish students; instead they say they are looking to “increase diversity.” But off the record, many admit that Jewish students bring certain assets, from leadership skills and good academic records, while they are on campus to a propensity for donating to the school once they graduate.

“We’re recruiting more on the East and West coasts, looking for students in private schools, and the Jewish day school students are very compatible with Bradley [University, in Peoria, Illinois].”

The article put me in mind of the famous 2002 AP story on Vanderbilt University’s gambit of recruiting Jews in an effort to raise mean SAT scores. The (small) Vandy backlash always struck me as misguided, and Fishkoff’s piece is a nice corrective to whatever of it remains. Jews ought to be (and most no doubt are) proud of their general tendency toward academic accomplishment and their desirability to colleges across the country.

U.S. Colleges With Few Jews Building Facilities To Draw More [JTA]
Related: Vanderbilt U. Woos Jewish Students [AP/BeliefNet]

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amadeus482000 says:

Interesting industry piece on how to turn out high-value object commodities.

Alternate title suggestion #1: Is your human Jewish investment working for you?

Alternate title suggestion #2: Surprise him with a pasta salad!

Follow-up piece: Let’s get some future actuarials on how the appreciation of Jewish human investment will stack up to various University brand names?

W. J. Cameron~ The last dejected effort often becomes the winning stroke.

Teacher: You aren’t paying attention to me. Are you having trouble hearing? Pupil: No, teacher I’m having trouble listening!

I wish more people would put down sites like this that are absolutely spellbinding to read.

2000

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Building Hillels To Entice

Colleges aspire to being Jew Us

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