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Boca Survivors to Get More Reparations

But what about their neighbors who freed them?

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The entrance to the Lodz ghetto.(Wikipedia)

As many as 16,000 Holocaust survivors in Boca Raton—the south Florida city where your parents or grandparents probably live—may be eligible for additional pensions from Germany after a German court ruled that applications to receive compensation for slave labor in the ghettos should be “liberalized.” Florida agencies will receive nearly $4.5 million from a German fund this year as a result of the ruling—a whopping 40 percent increase from last year.

I am all in favor of reparations for survivors—especially since, scandalously, one in four American ones lives below the poverty line. That said, I found it interesting that Col. Ellis Robinson (Ret.), a longtime Jewish Boca resident and (if I may say so) truly spectacular grandfather, is not also eligible for some Holocaust-based cash. The colonel was not a survivor of the camps; rather, as an officer who landed at Normandy, freed Paris, fought in the Ardennes, and crossed the Rhine at Remagen under General Patton, he helped free them.

So, I asked the colonel: Why isn’t he getting some cash now for his services?

He responded in an email: “Was glad to do it … FREE OF CHARGE.”

Former Nazi Slave Laborers Seek Payment from Germany [South Florida Sun Sentinel]
16,000 Floridians Get a Shot at Holocaust Pensions [UPI/Vos Iz Neias?]

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Loved it! What a legacy you have.

BRAVO to your awesome grandfather. And, uh, tell him thank you?

Ellen Siegel Malter says:

I remember Ellis, when he was a young man living in Plainfield, New Jersey. He was married to the beautiful Raisa, and had two beautiful daughter. They were, and I’m sure still are the loves of his life. I never knew, as a little girl, what Ellis’s part in the war actually was. I’m even prouder now, to have shared his youthful years. He has always been an important part of our families life.

Ellen

This is actually a actually great review for me, should admit that you just are among the best bloggers I ever saw.Thanks for posting this informative article.

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Boca Survivors to Get More Reparations

But what about their neighbors who freed them?

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