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Daybreak: U.N. Wants Its Own Probe

Plus more ships set sail, and more in the news

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• As two Iranian-sponsored ships set sail for Gaza, the United Nations will press ahead with plans for an international probe into the flotilla incident in addition to Israel’s. [Haaretz]

• No U.S. citizen is involved in Israel’s probe—the international observers are Irish and Canadian—in an effort to lend it credibility. [JPost]

• Israelis are trepidatious about what the probe will find and the consequences thereof, but glad it’s not an international one. [LAT]

• What’s Egypt to do? It can’t let Turkey become the new top pro-Palestinian Sunni state … but it sure likes that blockade of bordering Gaza. [WP]

• Ireland is asking Israel to withdraw a designated diplomatic staff member over the eight fake Irish passports allegedly used in the January assassination of Mahmoud al-Mabhouh in Dubai. [Ynet]

• A former Jersey City, New Jersey, deputy mayor got three years for corruption charges stemming from Syrian Jewish scion Solomon Dwek’s whistle-blowing. [AP/Vos Iz Neias?]

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Daybreak: U.N. Wants Its Own Probe

Plus more ships set sail, and more in the news

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