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Can I Get an Amen?

The first female rabbi was ordained 40 years ago.  Now my Florida synagogue welcomes a woman to its pulpit.

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'Can I Get an Amen?' by Vanessa Davis, p. 1

'Can I Get an Amen?' by Vanessa Davis, p. 2

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barbarajaffe says:

we’ve come a long way, baby!!!!  mazal tov!!!

I love this! Thank you. But let’s remember Regina Jonas, ordained in Germany in 1935, died in Auschwitz in 1944, and left out of the historical record by her male colleagues who survived. She was the first woman rabbi, with all due respect to Rabbi Priesand, who is the 1st American woman rabbi, and the second global woman rabbi.

If you are going to make the role of a rabbi to be a cheerleader for the
Democratic party and to be a social worker, than females are better at that
then men.
 

Go ladies!

 I have been studying with a female rabbi, our Conservative congregation’s ritual director, for 4 1/2 years. I love the fact that our classes in Talmud/Torah reflect both male and female perspectives… from the scholars cited to the practices we examine in light of our movement and others. I know that I want to continue to study, especially with her, as I have grown more comfortable with my Jewish identity. At age 62, I am close to making a decision to become a bat mitzvah due, in part, to my terrific teacher and role model.

Larry027 says:

Don’t forget the Hasidic holy woman and religious leader, the Maiden of Ludmir (Hannah Rochel Verbermacher), 1805-1888. 

41953 says:

Hoorah for female rabbis! 

But how do they read all that anti-woman stuff in the Torah and the liturgy without throwing up?

eemdog says:

This is a fine article but the cartoon delivery trivializes the message.

eemdog says:

This is a fine article but the cartoon delivery trivializes the message.

CohenLaundry says:

Love the graphic art format! Secular Humanistic Jews also ordain female rabbis.

CohenLaundry says:

Love the graphic art format! Secular Humanistic Jews also ordain female rabbis.

well Sorry to say real SemiHa doesn’t exist anymore (and hasn’t since the 3rd century) and the title “rabbi” isn’t a legitimate title.

Woman leaders have always existed notable ones are Deborah the Judge of Israel in the Nabhi and Buria (Rabbi Meir’s wife) mentioned in the Talmudim.

well Sorry to say real SemiHa doesn’t exist anymore (and hasn’t since the 3rd century) and the title “rabbi” isn’t a legitimate title.

Woman leaders have always existed notable ones are Deborah the Judge of Israel in the Nabhi and Buria (Rabbi Meir’s wife) mentioned in the Talmudim.

Hmm … it looks like the images are broken now. :(

Can you fix?

Screenshot: http://cl.ly/1y2K0E1J3z251v2R0I1L

Hmm … it looks like the images are broken now. :(

Can you fix?

Screenshot: http://cl.ly/1y2K0E1J3z251v2R0I1L

Go ladies. Men are only too willing to take a back seat. In this case to stay at home on Saturdays (or Sundays in the case of female leadership in the Christian church) in their favorite seat and watch football. 

Go ladies. Men are only too willing to take a back seat. In this case to stay at home on Saturdays (or Sundays in the case of female leadership in the Christian church) in their favorite seat and watch football. 

She wasn’t ordained a rabbi or rabba, but everyone should know Asnat Barzani. Here’s a little introduction:
http://judaism.about.com/od/womenrabbis/a/asenathbarzani.htm

2000

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Can I Get an Amen?

The first female rabbi was ordained 40 years ago.  Now my Florida synagogue welcomes a woman to its pulpit.