Your email is not valid
Recipient's email is not valid
Submit Close

Your email has been sent.

Click here to send another

Space Case

In this week’s “Tell Me,” Tablet Magazine’s illustrated question-and-answer column, we learn of a would-be astronaut who grows disenchanted with the stars

Print Email

Liana Finck

Liana Finck

Liana Finck

Liana Finck

Liana Finck

Liana Finck

Liana Finck

Email your answers to tellme@tabletmag.com or share them in the comments below.

Print Email

COMMENTING CHARGES
Daily rate: $2
Monthly rate: $18
Yearly rate: $180

WAIT, WHY DO I HAVE TO PAY TO COMMENT?
Tablet is committed to bringing you the best, smartest, most enlightening and entertaining reporting and writing on Jewish life, all free of charge. We take pride in our community of readers, and are thrilled that you choose to engage with us in a way that is both thoughtful and thought-provoking. But the Internet, for all of its wonders, poses challenges to civilized and constructive discussion, allowing vocal—and, often, anonymous—minorities to drag it down with invective (and worse). Starting today, then, we are asking people who'd like to post comments on the site to pay a nominal fee—less a paywall than a gesture of your own commitment to the cause of great conversation. All proceeds go to helping us bring you the ambitious journalism that brought you here in the first place.

I NEED TO BE HEARD! BUT I DONT WANT TO PAY.
Readers can still interact with us free of charge via Facebook, Twitter, and our other social media channels, or write to us at letters@tabletmag.com. Each week, we’ll select the best letters and publish them in a new letters to the editor feature on the Scroll.

We hope this new largely symbolic measure will help us create a more pleasant and cultivated environment for all of our readers, and, as always, we thank you deeply for your support.

Black holes singing? How could you hear them in the vacuum of space?

For me, I’d rather hear the wires of airplane biplanes singing. Katherine Stinson, the fourth woman in the US to earn her pilot’s license, in 1912, sold her piano to pay for flying lessons. She wanted to be a barnstormer so she could earn enough money to continue studying piano, in Europe. In her day, Katherine became a world-famous aviatrix. After several years, reporters asked if she would ever go back to playing the piano. To which she replied, “The wind singing in my airplane’s wires is all the music my ears want to hear now.”

Dan Klein says:

Hey Debra,

Short answer is: Black holes create gravity waves, which can be detected by machinery and converted into sound. Shorter answer: Because the universe is awesome.

mARIAN says:

Some time ago, I started making a costume to wear to a SF convention. I was to be the Queen of Sheba. Expensive costume. I never completely finished the thing; it required sewing lots of sequins. I should drag it out again for Purim.

liana says:

Debra, what a beautiful story! Thanks. Dan – so would you really hear sound without the machinery? I heard a black hole on NPR once…it WAS awesome. Marian, sci-fi convention? You definitely should wear it for Purim.

2000

Your comment may be no longer than 2,000 characters, approximately 400 words. HTML tags are not permitted, nor are more than two URLs per comment. We reserve the right to delete inappropriate comments.

Thank You!

Thank you for subscribing to the Tablet Magazine Daily Digest.
Please tell us about you.

Space Case

In this week’s “Tell Me,” Tablet Magazine’s illustrated question-and-answer column, we learn of a would-be astronaut who grows disenchanted with the stars