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Our ‘Brazen Giant’ Turns 125

Nextbook Press presents an annotated version of ‘The New Colossus’

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There may be no better way to recognize the 125th anniversary of the largest gift France ever gave the United States by taking a fresh look at “The New Colossus,” the Emma Lazarus-penned sonnet dedicated to the Statue of Liberty. (For our Québec readers, it is also known as La Liberté éclairant le monde, or “An éclair stuffed with the cream of liberty.”) Our colleagues at Nextbook Press have just published an interactive edition of the verses annotated by Esther Schor, author of the Nextbook Press biography of the Sephardic American poet responsible for them. It contains all sorts of fun facts. For example, did you know the statue’s face was apparently based on that of sculptor Frédéric Auguste Bartholdi’s mother? How creepy!

On October 27—the day before the quasquicentennial of the statue’s dedication—Schor will hold forth on her subject at Philadelphia’s National Museum of American Jewish History.

Today in Tablet Magazine, for the Vox Tablet podcast, host Sara Ivry chats with several tourists headed to Liberty Island in 2006 about the sonnet.

Meantime, if you want to visit the new mini-colossus, a prominent real estate developer has stationed one of only 12 copies of the statue in front of 667 Madison Avenue, in New York. The catch? It’s only nine feet tall. It was reportedly purchased from the French for more than a million dollars and a promise to make one final Jerry Lewis movie happen.

New Colossus [Nextbook Press]
Huddled Masses [Tablet Magazine]
Related: Emma Lazarus [Nextbook Press]

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Our ‘Brazen Giant’ Turns 125

Nextbook Press presents an annotated version of ‘The New Colossus’

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