Your email is not valid
Recipient's email is not valid
Submit Close

Your email has been sent.

Click here to send another

thescroll_header

Sundown: DA Requests Judge Drop DSK Case

Plus, Abbas delays elections (again), BHL’s best week ever, and more

Print Email
Former International Monetary Fund leader Dominique Strauss-Kahn (right) and his wife Anne Sinclair leave a hearing where he was released on his own recognizance at New York State Supreme Court on July 1, 2011 in New York City.(Mario Tama/Getty Images)

• Manhattan District Attorney Cy Vance has filed papers asking the judge to dismiss the rape and assault charges against Dominique Strauss-Kahn and drop the case. [City Room]

• Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas has delayed local elections for the third time. The elections, which were first supposed to take place July 2010, have no scheduled date yet. [Ynet]

Foreign Policy checks in on Bernard Henri Lévy, who, for what its worth, might just be having the best week ever. [Foreign Policy]

• Jewish parents are foregoing the traditional bris, electing instead to hold what are called peaceful convenant ceremonies. Parental testimony abounds. [Salem-News]

• Joshua Cohen reviews Hungarian Péter Nádas’ latest work, Parallel Stories—which, at 1,000 pages, Cohen calls an ungodly work “not just aware of but positively evangelical about its own timelessness.” [NYMag]

• Jewish leaders in Berlin have asked local metal dealers to look out for suspicious wrought iron objects after vandals struck the Weissensee Cemetery, stealing $16,000 worth of items and damaging 16 gravesites at Europe’s largest Jewish cemetery. [Jewish Journal]

• A new documentary spotlights Hans Litten, the principled Jewish lawyer who drew charges against Hitler in 1931, questioned him brilliantly on the witness stand, and completely ticked him off. [BBC]

Print Email

COMMENTING CHARGES
Daily rate: $2
Monthly rate: $18
Yearly rate: $180

WAIT, WHY DO I HAVE TO PAY TO COMMENT?
Tablet is committed to bringing you the best, smartest, most enlightening and entertaining reporting and writing on Jewish life, all free of charge. We take pride in our community of readers, and are thrilled that you choose to engage with us in a way that is both thoughtful and thought-provoking. But the Internet, for all of its wonders, poses challenges to civilized and constructive discussion, allowing vocal—and, often, anonymous—minorities to drag it down with invective (and worse). Starting today, then, we are asking people who'd like to post comments on the site to pay a nominal fee—less a paywall than a gesture of your own commitment to the cause of great conversation. All proceeds go to helping us bring you the ambitious journalism that brought you here in the first place.

I NEED TO BE HEARD! BUT I DONT WANT TO PAY.
Readers can still interact with us free of charge via Facebook, Twitter, and our other social media channels, or write to us at letters@tabletmag.com. Each week, we’ll select the best letters and publish them in a new letters to the editor feature on the Scroll.

We hope this new largely symbolic measure will help us create a more pleasant and cultivated environment for all of our readers, and, as always, we thank you deeply for your support.

” Jewish parents are foregoing the traditional bris, electing instead to hold what are called peaceful convenient ceremonies. Parental testimony abounds”

Spell check strikes again. I’m sure they are more “convenient” for parents, but I’m sure in this context you meant “covenant”?

2000

Your comment may be no longer than 2,000 characters, approximately 400 words. HTML tags are not permitted, nor are more than two URLs per comment. We reserve the right to delete inappropriate comments.

Thank You!

Thank you for subscribing to the Tablet Magazine Daily Digest.
Please tell us about you.

Sundown: DA Requests Judge Drop DSK Case

Plus, Abbas delays elections (again), BHL’s best week ever, and more

More on Tablet:

Klinghoffer at the Met

By Paul Berman — John Adams’s masterpiece is about an American Jew murdered by Palestinian terrorists, but the real opera is off stage