Your email is not valid
Recipient's email is not valid
Submit Close

Your email has been sent.

Click here to send another

thescroll_header

Hezbollah’s Defeat Was Its Own Fault

Obama can’t claim credit for Islamic party’s mistakes

Print Email
()

Lebanon’s parliamentary elections yesterday delivered a strong blow to Hezbollah and its Iranian-Shiite patrons by granting the pro-Western March 14 coalition, consisting of Sunni, Druze, and Christian Lebanese, 71 seats out of a total of 128 seats in parliament. Granted, these returns had been predicted by local observers, and really all that was ensured by the victory was the political status quo—March 14 forces gained only one seat and will continue to share power with Hezbollah, which still controls 58 seats. And yet it’s undoubtedly encouraging that one of the most prominent and influential Islamist groups in the Middle East has been set back.

Journalists are already speculating that President Obama’s Cairo speech, addressed to all Muslims, is due for some of the credit. But that’s unlikely. For one thing, yesterday’s contest was waged in the predominantly Christian districts of Lebanon, where a violent, sharia-minded party of God has never had much appeal. And Hezbollah has used its authority to alienate those who may have once been sympathetic to it. It has repeatedly exercised a so-called “blocking minority,” or veto, as a member of the country’s Fouad Siniora-led unity government, a power that’s like a filibuster on steroids. And last year Hezbollah waged a mini-civil war in Beirut that completely shut down the government and prompted international fears of a bloody coup. No one requires a reaffirming pronouncement from a U.S. president to see that democratic jihadists are masters of their own misfortune.

March 14 Coalition Retains Majority After Parliamentary Elections [The Daily Star]

Print Email

COMMENTING CHARGES
Daily rate: $2
Monthly rate: $18
Yearly rate: $180

WAIT, WHY DO I HAVE TO PAY TO COMMENT?
Tablet is committed to bringing you the best, smartest, most enlightening and entertaining reporting and writing on Jewish life, all free of charge. We take pride in our community of readers, and are thrilled that you choose to engage with us in a way that is both thoughtful and thought-provoking. But the Internet, for all of its wonders, poses challenges to civilized and constructive discussion, allowing vocal—and, often, anonymous—minorities to drag it down with invective (and worse). Starting today, then, we are asking people who'd like to post comments on the site to pay a nominal fee—less a paywall than a gesture of your own commitment to the cause of great conversation. All proceeds go to helping us bring you the ambitious journalism that brought you here in the first place.

I NEED TO BE HEARD! BUT I DONT WANT TO PAY.
Readers can still interact with us free of charge via Facebook, Twitter, and our other social media channels, or write to us at letters@tabletmag.com. Each week, we’ll select the best letters and publish them in a new letters to the editor feature on the Scroll.

We hope this new largely symbolic measure will help us create a more pleasant and cultivated environment for all of our readers, and, as always, we thank you deeply for your support.

2000

Your comment may be no longer than 2,000 characters, approximately 400 words. HTML tags are not permitted, nor are more than two URLs per comment. We reserve the right to delete inappropriate comments.

Thank You!

Thank you for subscribing to the Tablet Magazine Daily Digest.
Please tell us about you.

Hezbollah’s Defeat Was Its Own Fault

Obama can’t claim credit for Islamic party’s mistakes

More on Tablet:

Landmark Gay Rights Protest Turns 50

By Jonathan Zalman — Today we celebrate the anniversary of the first-ever march on Washington, led by Frank Kameny