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Tune in Tomorrow To See Jewish Soccer

Why America’s Feilhaber may get the call

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Midfielder Benny Feilhaber.(Interview)

In last Saturday’s 1-1 draw with England, the United States—Tablet Magazine’s official soccer team—did not play any of its three Jewish members (maybe that’s why it was only a draw!). However, the dynamics of the American side’s match-up with Slovenia, which it plays tomorrow at 9:30 am E.S.T., makes it likely that we will see one of the Jewish players hit the pitch.

Slovenia plays a defense-minded 4-4-2, you see, whose strategy is almost identical to the United States’s: Pack it in on defense, requiring the opponent to bring more men toward the box; defend well; and use this imbalance to your advantage on quick counterattacks.

Against an offensively-minded England, it made sense to start defense-oriented Ricardo Clark opposite Michael Bradley at midfield. Against Slovenia, however, more of a two-way midfielder is preferable, which is why I have heard and read many (for example, Sports Illustrated’s Steve Davis, here) suggest that Clark be replaced by … Benny Feilhaber, whose grandparents fled from the Nazis to Brazil, and who plays midfield for a good squad in the Dutch league.

Which is bad news for the Slovenians. And better news for the ladies: Feilhaber is not particularly difficult on the eyes.

World Cup Soccer [Interview]
Earlier: U.S.A.! U.S.A.!

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Barcelona rules! What’s your favorite football team? http://apps.facebook.com/my_footballteam

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Tune in Tomorrow To See Jewish Soccer

Why America’s Feilhaber may get the call

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