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Shirtless Einstein Prompts Lawsuit

Hebrew U goes after GM

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The controversial ad.(Motor Trend)

The fierce protectors of Albert Einstein’s reputation—a.k.a. the good folks at Hebrew University in Jerusalem, which owns the rights to Einstein’s image—are suing General Motors over an advertisement that shows a shirtless and admirably cut Professor Albert. The graphic graphic is part of a GMC Terrain ad that is slated for the September issue of People that will reveal the magazine’s choice for Sexiest Man Alive (we’ve got money down on Idris Elba).

“Dr. Einstein with his underpants on display is not consummate with and causes injury to [the university’s] carefully guarded rights in the image and likeness of the famous scientist, political activist, and humanitarian,” a Hebrew U. lawyer says. Though we will agree: Ideas are sexy too!

The university owns the rights to Einstein’s image and guards them vigilantly—most of the time. Several years ago, it tangled in court with California-based Electronic Arts over a video game that imagined Einstein dueling with Hitler. On the other hand, it has been willing to sell Einstein’s image to help hawk computers, cameras, and, of course, Coca-Cola.

Full ad below the jump. Warning: It’s utterly ridiculous.

Israeli University Sues General Motors Over Ad Involving Einstein [Motor Trend]
Related: Einstein (the Demon Slayer) Lands in Court [NYT]

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Old Rockin' Dave says:

I don’t get the objections. A few friends saw the real Albert Einstein shirtless on his boat and were impressed at how muscular he actually was. I also don’t see now it would hurt Einstein’s image to portray him as a sexy beast; it might actually lead a few people to science who wouldn’t have taken an interest. Albert Einstein was a real human being, one who hiked and sailed, one who loved women and had affairs. He was not some kindly sexless old man in a lab coat.

Hi excellent blog there. keep it up.I seriously love to read your site.Last of all have good day

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Shirtless Einstein Prompts Lawsuit

Hebrew U goes after GM

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