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Today on Tablet

Subtle messages from fiction, and from God

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David L. Ulin delves into the short stories of Deborah Eisenberg, a “commentator on modern manners, a writer with a laser-sharp and ruthless eye”; he speaks to the author about the fact that she is “less interested in Jewishness as a category than as an attitude.” Liel Liebovitz examines this week’s haftorah and concludes that, when it comes to faith, “it’s not blind adherence to the rules that is paramount, but rather some elusive spirit.” And there’s much more to come, all day on The Scroll.

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Between me and my husband we’ve owned more MP3 players over the years than I can count, including Sansas, iRivers, iPods (classic & touch), the Ibiza Rhapsody, etc. But, the last few years I’ve settled down to one line of players. Why? Because I was happy to discover how well-designed and fun to use the underappreciated (and widely mocked) Zunes are.

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The Zune concentrates on being a Portable Media Player. Not a web browser. Not a game machine. Maybe in the future it’ll do even better in those areas, but for now it’s a fantastic way to organize and listen to your music and videos, and is without peer in that regard. The iPod’s strengths are its web browsing and apps. If those sound more compelling, perhaps it is your best choice.

Its like you read my mind! You appear to know so much about this, like you wrote the book in it or somethingI think that you can do with some pics to drive the message home a little bit, but other than that, this is great blogAn excellent readI will certainly be back.

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Today on Tablet

Subtle messages from fiction, and from God

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