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Sundown: Madoff May Be Sick

Plus long-planned settlements, R.I.P. Exodus captain, and more

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• Bernard Madoff was transferred to his North Carolina prison’s medical center. A federal spokesperson denied that Madoff is terminally ill or has cancer. [NY Post]
• New documents obtained by Israeli human rights groups show that when West Bank settlement Ma’ale Adumim was first conceived in 1975, the government planned to eventually annex its land. [JTA]
• Following the theft and recovery of Auschwitz’s “Arbeit Macht Frei” sign, the Polish culture minister allocated an additional $137,000 for security at the site. [Ynet]
• An argument in favor of making Taglit-Birthright more pluralistic in terms of how it presents the politics of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. [Jewcy]
• Yitzhak Aharonovitch, the captain of the Exodus—the famous ship that brought 4500 European Jews to Palestine in 1947—died in Israel. He was 86. [Ynet]

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Sundown: Madoff May Be Sick

Plus long-planned settlements, R.I.P. Exodus captain, and more

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