Your email is not valid
Recipient's email is not valid
Submit Close

Your email has been sent.

Click here to send another

thescroll_header

Mamet’s New Play Receives Mixed Reviews

‘Race’ tackles just that

Print Email
Mamet at the 2008 TriBeCa Film Festival.(Bryan Bedder/Getty Images for TriBeCa Film Festival)

There are few active playwrights whose new plays constitute events in and of themselves, but David Mamet, who is also the author of Nextbook Press’s The Wicked Son, surely belongs in that elite handful, and last night’s opening of his Race is one of those events. The play, which is running at Broadway’s Ethel Barrymore Theatre, is a rapid four-person drama (albeit with much humor: it is, after all, by Mamet) about three lawyers, two black and one white, who are defending a white man accused of raping a young black girl.

Reviews so far have been mixed. The New York Times concluded, “Despite the tension of its subject, and an abundance of the corkscrew plot twists for which Mr. Mamet is known, Race lacks real dramatic tension” (the review did reserve special praise for lead actor James Spader). “His ideas lack their usual polemical bite and there’s something tentative about the overall vision,” the Los Angeles Times agrees. USA Today, however, gives Mamet “credit for a briskly entertaining, if flawed, study.” And Bloomberg’s critic advises, “You can relish Race quite independently of whether you consider it bravura or bravado.” Mamet, whose plays themselves are frequently obsessed with language and talking, if nothing else seems always able to provoke a discussion.

The Wicked Son: Anti-Semitism, Self-Hatred, and the Jews [Nextbook Press]

Print Email

COMMENTING CHARGES
Daily rate: $2
Monthly rate: $18
Yearly rate: $180

WAIT, WHY DO I HAVE TO PAY TO COMMENT?
Tablet is committed to bringing you the best, smartest, most enlightening and entertaining reporting and writing on Jewish life, all free of charge. We take pride in our community of readers, and are thrilled that you choose to engage with us in a way that is both thoughtful and thought-provoking. But the Internet, for all of its wonders, poses challenges to civilized and constructive discussion, allowing vocal—and, often, anonymous—minorities to drag it down with invective (and worse). Starting today, then, we are asking people who'd like to post comments on the site to pay a nominal fee—less a paywall than a gesture of your own commitment to the cause of great conversation. All proceeds go to helping us bring you the ambitious journalism that brought you here in the first place.

I NEED TO BE HEARD! BUT I DONT WANT TO PAY.
Readers can still interact with us free of charge via Facebook, Twitter, and our other social media channels, or write to us at letters@tabletmag.com. Each week, we’ll select the best letters and publish them in a new letters to the editor feature on the Scroll.

We hope this new largely symbolic measure will help us create a more pleasant and cultivated environment for all of our readers, and, as always, we thank you deeply for your support.

2000

Your comment may be no longer than 2,000 characters, approximately 400 words. HTML tags are not permitted, nor are more than two URLs per comment. We reserve the right to delete inappropriate comments.

Thank You!

Thank you for subscribing to the Tablet Magazine Daily Digest.
Please tell us about you.

Mamet’s New Play Receives Mixed Reviews

‘Race’ tackles just that

More on Tablet:

A Grandfather’s Hidden Love Letters From Nazi Germany Reveal a Buried Past

By Vox Tablet — Reporter Sarah Wildman’s grandfather escaped Vienna in 1938. Long after he died, she discovered the life—and lover—he left behind.