Your email is not valid
Recipient's email is not valid
Submit Close

Your email has been sent.

Click here to send another

thescroll_header

Israel in Pictures

Some sidelong glances at the Jewish State

Print Email
The author on a hill in the West Bank overlooking Jerusalem.(Photos by the author)

For the three weeks before this one, I was in Israel, on-duty for The Roll. What follows are some snapshots from my iPhone. Why? Partly because it’s 4pm the day before the Fourth of July. And partly because one thing I learned is that American Jews who care about Israel don’t have nearly enough contact with Israel in any real way. Not that my photos are particularly a “real way,” but hopefully they are a bit more visceral than a dash more of pontification.

This was a good 50 yards from where I slept in the southern kibbutz of Sde Boker.

Any city (this is Jerusalem) that names places after Isaiah Berlin is good by me:

In case you can’t see, this large poster in downtown Bethlehem declares, in English, “Return is our Right and our Destiny.”

This reminded me of one of those balconies in the French Quarter of New Orleans. In fact, it’s in the Jewish Quarter of the Old City of Jerusalem.

Yes, they also just have Big Macs. This McDonald’s was in Dimona.

Fizzy bubbelah! Disco disco! (Knesset in the background.)

I’m told that there was a rat problem, so they brought in cats. Now, there is a cat problem. Sheinkin Street, Tel Aviv.

At a Steimatzky bookstore in the Baka neighborhood of Jerusalem. No further comment.

In the Abu Tor neighborhood of East Jerusalem, south of the Old City.

Best meal I had in Israel? Lunch at “Syrian Guy Hummus” (seriously, I asked a bystander, “Hoomoos shel al suri?“) near the Carmel Market in Tel Aviv. This has ful, which are essentially fava beans, mixed in.

Finally: say what you want about Zionism, I think it’s Herzl’s dream fulfilled that there is a country where the dogs speak Hebrew. This was taken after I told this kibbutznik to “shev!”

Print Email

COMMENTING CHARGES
Daily rate: $2
Monthly rate: $18
Yearly rate: $180

WAIT, WHY DO I HAVE TO PAY TO COMMENT?
Tablet is committed to bringing you the best, smartest, most enlightening and entertaining reporting and writing on Jewish life, all free of charge. We take pride in our community of readers, and are thrilled that you choose to engage with us in a way that is both thoughtful and thought-provoking. But the Internet, for all of its wonders, poses challenges to civilized and constructive discussion, allowing vocal—and, often, anonymous—minorities to drag it down with invective (and worse). Starting today, then, we are asking people who'd like to post comments on the site to pay a nominal fee—less a paywall than a gesture of your own commitment to the cause of great conversation. All proceeds go to helping us bring you the ambitious journalism that brought you here in the first place.

I NEED TO BE HEARD! BUT I DONT WANT TO PAY.
Readers can still interact with us free of charge via Facebook, Twitter, and our other social media channels, or write to us at letters@tabletmag.com. Each week, we’ll select the best letters and publish them in a new letters to the editor feature on the Scroll.

We hope this new largely symbolic measure will help us create a more pleasant and cultivated environment for all of our readers, and, as always, we thank you deeply for your support.

were can i get pics of jerusalem street scenes

Judy Lash Balint says:

I have a load of Jerusalem street scenes at http://www.flickr.com/photos/jerusalemdiaries/

2000

Your comment may be no longer than 2,000 characters, approximately 400 words. HTML tags are not permitted, nor are more than two URLs per comment. We reserve the right to delete inappropriate comments.

Thank You!

Thank you for subscribing to the Tablet Magazine Daily Digest.
Please tell us about you.

Israel in Pictures

Some sidelong glances at the Jewish State

More on Tablet:

Klinghoffer at the Met

By Paul Berman — John Adams’s masterpiece is about an American Jew murdered by Palestinian terrorists, but the real opera is off stage