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Old McYankel Had a Farm

With 200 acres, a love of the mamaloshen, and little by way of experience, a dreamer starts Yiddish Farm

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(Chaela Herridge-Meyers)

Last summer, 18people paid anywhere between $2,000 and $4,000 to plant cucumbers, scrub potatoes, and build a chicken coop on 200 acres in Goshen, N.Y., all while speaking in a language few of them know. They were enrolled in the first full session of Yiddish Farm, the brainchild of 26-year-old Naftali Ejdelman. Ejdelman comes by his Yiddish honestly; he is the grandson of the late Yiddish professor Mordkhe Schaechter and grew up speaking the language at home. His farming experience, however, is less extensive (as he’s the first to admit). That didn’t stop him from procuring land, recruiting a partner, Yisroel Bass, and launching the first and only Yiddish-language-based shomer-shabbos working organic farm. In September, Vox Tablet sent reporter Nina Porzucki to find out how the farm, and its farmers, were faring. [Running time: 10:40.] 

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Kelsey Osgood says:

Do they have a scholarship program?

One correction: Naftali grew up speaking Yiddish.

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Old McYankel Had a Farm

With 200 acres, a love of the mamaloshen, and little by way of experience, a dreamer starts Yiddish Farm

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