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Heretic

Despite the complicated history of Jewish defectors, the Jewish right has embraced Muslim apostates like Nonie Darwish, an Egyptian-born Christian convert who voices anti-Islamic rhetoric

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Nonie Darwish, 2009. (Former Muslims United)

In April, Nonie Darwish, a 61-year-old Egyptian-born author, was sworn in as a witness before a New York State Senate committee hearing on homeland security. She had been invited to speak at the hearing by Sen. Gregory Ball, a freshman Republican from Putnam County and chairman of the Committee on Veterans, Homeland Security, and Military Affairs.

Darwish first gained attention for her memoir, Now They Call Me Infidel: Why I Denounced Jihad for America, Israel, and the War on Terror. The daughter of a high-ranking officer in the Egyptian army, Darwish, who founded a group called Arabs for Israel, quickly became a favorite speaker on politics and women’s issues. She had never before been considered an expert on homeland security.

Darwish is part of a new crop of Arab writers and thinkers who encourage foreign policy decisions that differ dramatically from the conventional solutions offered by the Middle East policy establishment. Some of these are genuine spokespeople advancing an agenda of peaceful dialogue. Others seem to introduce ideas into the public discourse that would be controversial and exceptionally divisive if they were articulated by anyone other than an Arab Muslim.

During her public presentations, Darwish, a child of Middle Eastern aristocracy, often encounters a special rage. While her talks at universities and think tanks are couched in terms of human rights and her personal experiences growing up in Egypt, her comments are virtually identical to the anti-Muslim tenor heard on right-wing radio talk shows.

If this script sounds familiar to students of Jewish history, it should. During the medieval period, the Christian church regularly used Jewish apostates to argue the Christian case against the Jews. In many ways, Darwish represents a modern replication of these apostates’ positions—updated for the political arena.

***

In the Arabs for Israel charter, Darwish’s organization states, “We are Arabs and Muslims who believe.” Its website includes several bullet points advocating reformation of Islam, such as:

• “Diversity should be a virtue not only in the United States but should be encouraged around the world. We support a diverse Middle East with protection for human rights and respect and equality under the law to all minorities, including Jews and Christians.”

• “We stand firmly against suicide/homicide terrorism as a form of jihad.”

• “We are eager to see major reformation in how Islam is taught and channeled in order to bring out the best in Muslims and contribute to the uplifting of the human spirit and advancement of civilization.”

In her memoir, Darwish discusses her fondness for her family, early memories of her father, Col. Mustafa Hafez, and her eventual disillusion with Arab society. She begins with a vivid description of herself as a young girl, on a train from Gaza to Cairo, watching the scenery race by the window in her family’s private compartment of the train. The Gaza-Cairo train ride embodied for Darwish the luxurious life that she was accustomed to as a result of her father’s status as a highly ranked officer in the Egyptian army. In describing Israel’s targeted assassination of her father, and the bitterness and the personal difficulties that she faced growing up in Arab society without the protection of a male figure, she writes with astonishing forgiveness for Israel and expresses her hopes for peace in the Middle East and more rights for women and minorities in Arab countries.

A casual reader could be forgiven for mistaking her book as a plea for religious temperance among her Muslim co-religionists. However, Darwish is no moderate Muslim. In fact, she is not a Muslim at all. Notably, she left unmentioned the most striking element of her story—and the area in which she bears similarity to the medieval Jewish apostates. She is a convert to Christianity.

Repeatedly, she portrays herself as an advocate for human rights in Arab countries; however, even a cursory look at her writing and public comments demonstrates that she is not so much interested in critiquing human-rights abuses as she is in critiquing Arab culture. “The education of Arab children is to make killing of certain groups of people not only good, it’s holy,” she told that New York State Senate committee.

Such remarks suggest that Darwish is a uniquely one-dimensional advocate. She represents a personal betrayal to many Muslims and is routinely heckled and shouted down by Arab students when she speaks on campuses. After she spoke at Princeton University last year—a talk in which she said that it is “no joke” that Buckingham Palace will be turned into a mosque if Muslims are not kept in check—a non-Muslim Arab who attended the event wrote a letter to the university newspaper critiquing Darwish’s comments as “bold, unjustifiable declarations about the Islamic world [that] made even non-Muslims in the audience, like me, cringe.”

***

Most of Darwish’s income stems from speaking engagements for conservative groups and writing that she contributes to like-minded publications. She is a favorite commentator on right-wing blogs like American Thinker, FrontPage Magazine, and Jihad Watch. Darwish has disturbingly comfortable relationships with ideologues who profess inflammatory views about Islam. Her writing has appeared regularly on Pamela Geller’s conservative blog, Atlas Shrugs. Geller, who is Jewish and a former associate publisher at the New York Observer, has been called “the queen of Muslim-bashers” by the Council on American-Islamic Relations and has built her reputation by voicing outlandish claims on her blog. These have included a video suggesting that Muslims have sex with goats, an essay suggesting that President Barack Obama is the lovechild of Malcolm X, and a claim that the State Department is run by “Islamic supremacists.” Geller has called for the removal of the Dome of the Rock from the Temple Mount in Jerusalem.

Other allies of Darwish have made similarly disturbing comments. David Horowitz, editor of FrontPage Magazine, another publication to which Darwish regularly contributes, has said, “The Palestinians are Nazis.” In April 2008, while speaking at the University of California, Santa Barbara, Horowitz commented that the keffiyeh, a traditional Arab head-covering, is a symbol of terrorism. (Horowitz, it’s worth noting, is also a professional provocateur.)

Arabs seem to view Darwish’s activities in much the same way that Jews have historically viewed the actions of the medieval Jewish apostates. Of the Muslims she encounters, Darwish observes, “They send me e-mails wondering who is behind me, who is funding me. This is the way Arabs regard those who dissent; they assume we cannot think like that on our own or act out of free will.”

Paul of Burgos, an apostate originally named Shlomo Ha-levi, became the Archbishop of Burgos in 1415 and took an active role in the forced conversion of Spain’s Jews beginning in 1411. Paul was responsible for drawing up edicts that “deprived [Jews] of almost all means of earning a living, leaving them with the choice of death by privation for themselves and their families or conversion,” according to Kenneth Levin, author of The Oslo Syndrome: Delusions of a People Under Siege.

More scholarly apostates took an active role in a series of disputations intended to prove to Jews that Christianity had superseded Judaism. One such convert from Judaism to Christianity, Nicholas Donin, persuaded Pope Gregory IX to issue a bill that required burning the books of the Talmud. Donin participated in the Disputation of Paris, during which he pointed out several passages in the Talmud that were degrading to non-Jews. These claims, while true, were extremely embarrassing to the Jewish population.

In much the same way, Darwish’s outspoken critiques of Islam and Arab culture are extremely problematic to those who share her religious and national background, and the accuracy of her representation of Islam has been hotly debated. After she made a presentation at Tufts University last year, a student interfaith group, the New Initiative for Middle East Peace Dialogue, met to discuss the lecture and declared that she “spoke well beyond the scope of her qualifications and that her controversial opinions on Islam were rooted in misunderstandings and generalizations,” according to the Tufts Daily.

“Now I am called an infidel!” Darwish writes in her memoir of her isolation from other Arabs and Muslims. “In their eyes, I am no longer a good Arab or a good Muslim for supporting the war on terror, advocating peace with Israel, and standing up to the culture of jihad.” The full story of her political disillusionment with the Muslim world is more complicated than passages like this suggest.

It is striking that she omitted from her memoir her conversion to Christianity, particularly in light of her astonishment at being called an infidel. Indeed, considering her Christianity and her affiliation with an evangelical mega-church, the suggestion that she is called an infidel because she advocates peace with Israel seems remarkably disingenuous. While the term “infidel” is rightfully offensive to non-Muslims, there is little doubt that traditional Muslims would view Darwish’s lifestyle and religious decisions as no less than heretical.

“It’s telling that the people Republicans are turning to for their anti-mosque street cred are not ‘moderate, peace-loving’ Muslims, since even Muslim Republicans are disgusted by their party’s actions,” political commentator Peter Beinart wrote in the the Daily Beast during the heated public debate over Park51, the planned Muslim community center that has inaccurately been termed “the Ground Zero Mosque.” “The GOP’s new heroes are former Muslims like Nonie Darwish and Ayaan Hirsi Ali.”

Darwish has been enthusiastically embraced by Republican Jews, and she has reciprocated the affection. Numerous references to Jewish groups are made throughout Now They Call Me Infidel. In her acknowledgments, she mentions the leaders of several Jewish student organizations and Israel advocacy groups, including Jennifer Lazlo, of the Israel Project, Roz Rothstein, of Stand With Us, and Ilan Sharon, of Minnesotans Against Terrorism. She says that her public speaking career began when a Jewish friend, whom she refers to only as “Selma,” encouraged Darwish to speak to her Hadassah group.

The enthusiastic Jewish embrace of an apostate attacking her people at every opportunity is a strange course of action for a group that has throughout its history bristled when one of our own advocated a stance that others believed to not be “good for the Jews.” In October, Pamela Geller, the wise-cracking Jewish creator of the Atlas Shrugs blog, told the New York Times that “a moderate Muslim is a secular Muslim.” Or, even better, a converted one.

Jeremy Seth Davis is a journalist living in New Jersey. His writing has appeared in FT.com and the New York Daily News, among other publications.

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Bill Pearlman says:

So let me get this straight. This woman is the “bad guy”. Peter Beinart is the “good guy”. Not often that you read such inspired idiocy.

Joel says:

To compare a muslim today to a “medieval Jewish apostates” is not only wrong it’s anti-semitic. How can you even compare the Jews in medieval to Arabs today!.

Jonathan B. says:

So what exactly is it that Nonie Darwish has said that you disagree with, or is factually incorrect? And what do you think would happen to her if she were to climb on a perch in Tahrir Square or elsewhere where they are celebrating this fine “Arab Spring” and spoke her mind as an apostate which, as you must surely know, is punishable by death according to the Qu’ran? I know the folks at CAIR know this. Have you no sense of the courage and bravery of this woman whom you characterize as one dimensional, and contemptuously equate with Pam Geller in order to denigrate her and destroy her credibility? Show us the spokesmen and their throngs of ‘moderate, peace-loving’ Muslim constituents that you and Mr. Beinart have in mind, sir.

Are the bullet points you cite controversial?

“In the Arabs for Israel charter, Darwish’s organization states, “We are Arabs and Muslims who believe.” Its website includes several bullet points advocating reformation of Islam, such as:

• “Diversity should be a virtue not only in the United States but should be encouraged around the world. We support a diverse Middle East with protection for human rights and respect and equality under the law to all minorities, including Jews and Christians.”

• “We stand firmly against suicide/homicide terrorism as a form of jihad.”

• “We are eager to see major reformation in how Islam is taught and channeled in order to bring out the best in Muslims and contribute to the uplifting of the human spirit and advancement of civilization.”

“Geller has called for the removal of the Dome of the Rock from the Temple Mount in Jerusalem.”

You say that like it’s a bad thing.

Michael says:

Most of your blogs are far — sometimes very far — left. Why?
No, you’re not anti-Semitic, and no, you’re not anti-Israel. But one might be forgiven for thinking so seeing that you choose to side more with those who are anti- then those who aren’t.

If you can’t be pro-Jewish and pro-Israel, could you at least try to be more balanced?

Michael

paula levin says:

agree with bill. idiocy.

I must say, unlike bloggers above, I found this article balanced, though (calling a spade a spade) she’s no different than Judith Butler and other Jews who are knee-deep in the anti-Israel boycott/sanctions/etc. movement. She’s just on the extreme right and JB et al. on the extreme left. Both odious.

Barry says:

I feel for Jeremy’s outrgate:

She expects the Mohammedans to refrain from killing children? Racist!

Diversity? You kufr!

Mohammedans should adapt to our superior values? Far Rightist!

I’ll tell you who else agrees with Jeremy. The police chief of Deerborn. Da Chief explained during the Pastor Jones trial that American Mohammedans are subhuman. He explained that when American Mohammedans disagree with something politically they are mandated by the Koran to violently attack. That’s a sentiment we can ALL agree with, right Jeremy? That Mohammedans cannot be expected to adhere to human behavior. That’s the point of your piece, right?

So, yes, I agree with Jeremy Davis that American (and Middle Eastern) Muslims should be held to a very low standard of behavior because they are subhuman. Not like those ‘far rightists’ who seem to think that Mohammedans can act human.

This is one of the first articles I have read here at Tablet, and I wonder-is it indicative of the thinking and writing here? Mr Davis has some work to do to understand Nonie Darwish (and other apostates and Muslim “heretics” speaking out against the ideology of Islam). The truth has no agenda, and she has no reason to tell her story any other way. Why he compares Darwish and those like her to medieval Jewish apostates used by Christians to prove that Christianity superseded Judaism, I don’t understand. As a half-Jewish agnostic I claim no knowledge of such things, but I have researched the present predicament and it is dire! To brush it off as some kind of conspiracy to subvert Islam is so off the point as to be absurd. Nonie Darwish speaks the truth, and it is time to wake up and acknowledge that truth, however inconvenient is may be to those who like the view under the sand! Islam is an ideology, like communism or nazism, bent on taking over the world, and it’s time for us to wake up!!!!

Jeremy Seth Davis bites the hand that feeds us.

jacon.arnon says:

Jeremy, are yuo saying that no perosn who grew up Muslims has a right to leave that relgion and speak out for Israel?

At a minimum she has the right of freedom of speech.

Would you want to see her murdered by other Muslims? is that your point?
Is your further point that Jews should never stand up for Muslims who reject extremism?

I am on the left but I completely disagree with your views, Jeremy.

It is leftists like you who refused to tell the truth about Stalin and the Soviet State that helped destory tens of thousands of Jews there.

You seem to be trying to do the same for Jews and liberal non Muslims under Islam.

Shame on you.

jacon.arnon says:

all good points, fw.

Sophia says:

Wait a second. I’m a left wing Jew and I like Noni Darwish.

She speaks from experience in modern Egyptian society – not exactly a hotbed of human rights, especially for women and minorities.

Gay people? Forgetaboutit.

Since when is the defense of human rights a right wing concern?

Indeed this is one of the wierdest thing about left wing anti-Zionists. They seem not to realize that Israeli society, despite the fact that yes it remains at war, nevertheless protects the rights of women, gays, and religious and ethnic minorities and most importantly, perhaps, the right of people to speak and act freely – even against the interests of the State.

Since when did this kind of respect for human rights become “right wing?”

It bugs me bigtime, because I don’t want to be lumped in with the Right, with whose ideas about women’s rights, environment and economic matters I emphatically disagree, simply because I recognize that a) Israel isn’t evil; and b) that the Arab world has a ways to go when it comes – especially – to women’s rights but also to minority religious, ethnic and gay rights.

So?

Sophia says:

PS – Pamela Geller? YOU JEST.

She is a hate monger. Please don’t lump us in with her.

By “us” I mean people who challenge dogma – Judaism has progressed over the last several thousand years precisely because Jews challenge preconceptions about morals and ethics –

You knew this right?

Borg says:

Jeremy, why is she different from you? She is an apostate from Islam. You seem to be an apostate too, but she is trying to benefit humanity while you are trying to make a career as a hack. Try manual labor. It will be good for you

Just to take your examples:

…an apostate originally named Shlomo Ha-levi, became the Archbishop of Burgos in 1415 and took an active role in the forced conversion of Spain’s Jews beginning in 1411. Paul was responsible for drawing up edicts that “deprived [Jews] of almost all means of earning a living, leaving them with the choice of death by privation for themselves and their families or conversion,”…

… One such convert from Judaism to Christianity, Nicholas Donin, persuaded Pope Gregory IX to issue a bill that required burning the books of the Talmud….

Is Darwish advocating book burning and forced conversion on pain of starvation?

Barry says:

“Since when is the defense of human rights a right wing concern?”

WHAT?!!!! Defense of Human Rights has ALWAYS been an EXCLUSIVELY right-wing concern. To the extent that the left pretend to care about human rights, its just a rhetorical device to bludgeon their enemies.

Why aren’t leftist at the forefront of the war against Nazism, Islam, and Communism? Why is it only right-wing parties in Europe working to dismantle the Muslonazi colonies and criminalize the Burqa?

Why do violent, imperialistic, pro-jihad American Nazis, Muslims, and Communists feel at home in leftist ‘anti-war’ demonstrations? If you believe in Human Rights you cannot empathize with Nazis, Muslims or Communists.

I share some discomfort with Jewish organizations sponsoring speakers who criticize Islam or the Arab world. I don’t think the comparison to Jewish apostates in Medieval times is valid — just too many dissimilar points in the two cases — but I still think Hillel’s dictum “That which is abhorrent to you …” should apply. Muslim bashing, as understandable as it may be given the negative propaganda aimed at the Jewish State, is a bad precedent. To this extent I agree with the article’s ostensive premise.

On the other hand, the characterization of Nonie Darwish, who she is, what she’s done and what she stands for, feels libelous. The author makes it seem like there is something devious about her campaign, yet never makes the case and even contradicts himself. (Darwish runs an organization called “Former Muslims United”: how does that suggest she’s secretive about her conversion?)

I heard Darwusg speak about 5-6 years ago and I was very encouraged to learn that there were Arabs and (former-)Muslims who felt that peace with Israel was possible. In particular, Darwish pointed to fundamentalist and extremist movements as the culprits, not Islam itself, which made me hopeful that there was a path to peace. It was a nuanced critique of the conflict, far more so that I’d heard from most people talking about the Arab world.

Rather than take to task the conservative groups who uphold those who, like Darwish or Ayaan Hirsi Ali, speak from direct experience about the dark side of Islam, the author should also ask why the liberal world rejects them. When Ali came to the U.S., only the conservative American Enterprise Foundation welcomed her. The liberal world needs to be able to hear people like Darwish and Ali without being scared that they may hear something that could turn them into Islamaphobes.

Just as a point of comparison, Tariq Ramadan, a favorite of the left and no AIPAC stooge, styles himself as an advocate for reform of Islam. Isn’t his grand project reconciliation of the core of Islam with Western Enlightenment values?

Much of the left-wingers and communists who come from Jewish heritage can also be called apostates – in that their political identity allows and encourages them to act anti-Israeli and anti-Semitic without a shred of hesitancy.

From Trotsky on, those in the Soviet military and secret police who destroyed Jewish communities and leaders were often of Jewish heritage. And now it is often apostate left-wing extremists of Jewish heritage who lead the anti-Israeli activity in the west, in academia and elsewhere. And in this case, a left wing Davis criticizing those who challenge Islamic extremists.

Dorothy S. Wigod says:

When we heard Nonie Darwish speak at Columbia University some years ago (yes, Columbia — just a small lecture in a classroom) she mentioned her surprise, as a child at learning that an Israeli hospital had treated one of her relatives. This she said, made her begin to think differently about the Jews.

It is truly sad that the author has to libel someone like Nonie Darwish in order to justify his own cowardice in questioning the evils associated with the Islamic world…and yes, fgm, honor killings, force marriages, stonings, beheadings, killing of gays and lesbians, gender apartheid, and virulent Nazi-like antisemitism, to name just a few issues facing the world-wide Islamic community, are evil.Shame on the left for whitewashing these crimes against humanity and shame on this author for trying to denigrate the political right for standing up for freedom for all people in the Moslem world.

Have the Israel-is-never-wrong ideologues managed to drive away all those who see things in a different way? I don’t think I’ve ever seen a run of 23 comments that all agree with each other on Tablet before. Well, some one’s got to break the pattern. My reading of Jeremy’s article is that he’s pointing out the ways in which Ms Darwish uses the camouflage of Muslim reform and calls for diversity to mask a less benevolent agenda. I know nothing about Darwish beyond what is reported above. But I do know that supporters of monolithic, one-diimensional version of how Jews should think often go to bed with odd partners. Seems that 23 people are upset by Jeremy’s wish to look beneath the carefully arranged public version on the AIPAC circuit.

Corey, why is Muslim Reform camouflage? The notion of an Islam yet to undergo the transformation of modernity has been a staple of political discourse since before 9/11, on the left and the right. In fact it emerged as a sympathetic interpretation of a religion no different from Judaism or Christianity insofar as none of them are without archaic conventions that must be re-examined and sometimes discarded in light of fundamental changes in our perspective on religious authority in the twenty-first century.

And why second guess Darwish’s motives? Maybe she would just like to drive in Saudi Arabia, or travel at liberty without concern for whether her dress conforms to local religious strictures? The only goods on her in this piece are that she is ‘disturbingly comfortable’ with Jewish right-wingers. (There was actually an old Simpsons episode when Milhouse has to borrow Lisa’s bicycle. “What it’s like riding a girl’s bicycle, Milhouse?” “Disturbingly comfortable, Bart.”)

And likening her to Jewish apostates in the Middle Ages strikes me as gross hyperbole. Jews were a tiny minority living at the sufferance of an infinitely more powerful majority. And as we read in Tablet last week, when they ran afoul of it, they were given a crash course in well-engineering. The asymmetries in power aren’t comparable.

Bryna Weiss says:

Jeremy couldn’t be a better spokesperson for Darwish. His article and reasoning are so absurd and without merit, that it makes Nonie Darwish an even more appealing person.

Adam says:

Whatever the merits of his opposition to Darwish, Davis’ comparison with medieval apostates is obviously an attempt to rouse Jewish sympathies. But it is a cheap shot. In addition to the points already raised by other respondents above:

-Jewish apostates intentionally misrepresented Judaism. Call Darwish an extremist if you like, but where is the misrepresentation?

-Rabbis were forced to debate with apostates. Muslims have no such requirement.

Carrie says:

This article makes no sense. The attempts to paint Nonie Darwish as an extremist are also nonsensical. She rightly blames extremist Islam as behind many of the ills in this world. I believe the 9/11 commission came to the same conclusion. Are the people behind the 9/11 commission extremist Islamaphobes too?
Why is it that so many on the left have pushed away actual liberals from the Arab world? Tariq Ramadan is embraced by the left and people like Nonie Darwish and Ayaan Hirsi Ali are demonized by them. Truly absurd.

Yuri says:

Jeremy– you don’t have to go that far in history in search of Jewish apostates: Norman Finkelstein, David Biale, Judith Butler, Bethina Aptaker, Gabi Pitterberg, Shlomo Sand, Daniel…

B.O.R.G. is write.
The author is a deliberate idiot.
Jewish apostates in Spain are in no way similar to Ms. Darwish’s conversion to Islam.

Sigh.

oliver says:

Jeremy,
Is this about Nonie Darwish or your hate for the conservative movement? And since when is celebrating diversity, women’s rights, and religious freedom a right-wing agenda? Wow… your hate for the right-wing has blinded your ability to write any relevant and/or meaningful thought….

Doc says:

I read her books and hears her speak several times. Frankly, the woman is not very bright except in figuring out how to make a living by telling Jewish groups exactly what they want to hear, which is Jews -good and Arabs -bad. She goes on tour for Jewish federations, hadssah groups, ZOA and Chabad on campus talking about sharia but she is totally unqualified to address the topic.. She attended christian schools in Egypt and has zero education in Islam. She rambles when she speaks and has a guy who writes her books for her. She is congenial in person but makes a big show about charging thousands of dollars to speak only bc she needs such security at her home tomprotect her from the bad Muslims. Yet when asked, she freely admitted to NEVER being threatened and travels w/o security.

Marisia says:

This article just illustrates how screwed up the Jewish Left is: A peace-loving Christian Arab critical of the violent anti-Semitic Arab culture should be spurned in favor of an authentic Jew-killing Moslem Arab!

“Why aren’t leftist at the forefront of the war against Nazism”

You really don’t know your WWII history, do you? Conservative governments were generally in favor appeasing Hitler. It was liberals like FDR who were readying for the upcoming war against fascism, much to the consternation of his more right wing political opponents. There are also whole books about the anti-Soviet left.

That said, as someone of “the left” I support Israel because Israel protects freedom of speech, freedom of religion, women’s rights, gay rights, labor rights, and has governmental and judicial transparency– quite unlike any of those who seek its destruction.

If the right-wing has decided to support these freedoms in Israel, I welcome their conversion: now let us see them practice the same in the United States.

While I am concerned about Ms. Darwish’s associations, and about her allegedly misleading autobiographical statements, let’s be very clear in identifying what she has actually said– not what has been said by her fellow travelers.

John Coffin says:

Ms Darwish has a right to report her own experience. How reliable she is is one matter. That her opposition to Muslim violence and bigotry puts in contact with creepy right-wing ideologues is not her fault.

I believe Orwell once wrote: “The truth is still true, even when it appears in the Daily Mail.”

Please read this response to the Davis piece in the popular website, Virtual Jerusalem…

http://www.virtualjerusalem.com/blogs.php?Itemid=4062

drom says:

Jeremy Seth Davis is a “journalist”. Case closed.

I am concerned that Tablet’s editorial judgment is so low as to publish Davis’ flabby and weird article. This quote takes the cake as a non sequitur:
“…even a cursory look at her writing and public comments demonstrates that she is not so much interested in critiquing human-rights abuses as she is in critiquing Arab culture.”

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Heretic

Despite the complicated history of Jewish defectors, the Jewish right has embraced Muslim apostates like Nonie Darwish, an Egyptian-born Christian convert who voices anti-Islamic rhetoric

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